A Beautiful, Intelligent Declaration Against Transgender Tyranny




Abigail Shrier is a brave patriot and deserves a moment of your time. She is the author of IRREVERSIBLE DAMAGE: The Transgender Craze Seducing Our Daughters (2020). Named to “Best Books” lists by the Economist, Times of London. She is one of the few to speak out against the transgender insanity that grips America.
Abigail’s remarks are quite salient in light of the latest controversy out of the University of Pennsylvania, where a biological male declared himself a women and is swimming on the women’s team:

Lia Thomas, a 22-year old transgender swimmer at the University of Pennsylvania, has been shattering women’s records at the school.
Before her transition, she competed for three years at Penn as a man, named Will Thomas.

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At a meet including Princeton and Cornell on Nov. 20, Thomas had a 1:43:47 time in the 200-meter freestyle and 4:35:06 in the 500-meter freestyle. These times were records for Penn and would have placed Thomas second and third, respectively, in the NCAA Women’s Championships, according to the website OutKick.
It is unknown when Thomas transitioned from male to female, but the swimmer competed as a man as recently as November 2019. NCAA rules mandate at least one year of testosterone suppression treatment to be eligible to compete as a woman

Abigail recently spoke to students at Princeton University about the transgender tyranny. She is eloquent and wicked smart and has stood tall against a withering storm of bullying. Here is a portion of what she said:

The question I get most often—the thing that most interviewers want to know, even when they’re pretending to care about more high-minded things—is:  What’s it like to be so hated?  I can only assume that’s what some of you rubberneckers want to know as well:  What’s it like to be on a GLAAD black list? What’s it like to have top ACLU lawyers come out in favor of banning your book? What’s it like to have prestigious institutions disavow you as an alum? What’s it like to lose the favor of the fancy people who once claimed you as their own?
So, perhaps I’ll begin by telling you a little bit about myself mainly because I’m not so different from many of you. I grew up, daughter of two Maryland State judges, in a multi-racial suburb in Prince George’s County, Maryland. I attended a community Jewish day school, which I loved. In high school, I worked as a stringer for the Washington Jewish Week and edited my school paper. I attended Columbia University, where I received the Kellett Fellowship for two years of graduate study at Oxford. From there, I earned my J.D. from Yale Law School and then clerked for a Clinton-appointee on the D.C. Circuit.
At the beginning of my clerkship, I accepted a setup with a guy from Los Angeles, and by the end of that year, had decided to follow my then-boyfriend to California. I took a job with a terribly prestigious LA firm, whose daily tasks nearly anesthetized me. I married my boyfriend, struggled to hold onto pregnancies, quit law firm life and had three children. I taught them to read and sang them songs very badly and wrote a series of unpublishable novels. Most people who’d known me before wondered what the hell I was doing.
I began writing a few op-eds for our local Jewish paper, one of which was spotted by a Wall Street Journal editor, who invited me to submit to the Wall Street Journal. I did, and in the course of that year, published 13 op-eds with the Journal. One of those op-eds inspired a reader to contact me and tell me the story of her teen daughter who was rushing into a sudden gender transition. After trying and failing to find an investigative journalist who wanted the assignment, I took it on myself. My investigations turned into a book called Irreversible Damage.

All of which is to say: I’m not a provocateur. I don’t get a rush from making people angry. You don’t have to be a troll to find yourself in the center of controversy. You need only be two things: effective, and unwilling to back down.

Give yourself a belated Hanukkah gift or early Christmas gift and read her entire presentation here.
Thank God for courageous, principled women like Abigail.
 



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